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Finalizing Your Application

Once your database design is complete, it can be very complex with many Tables, Forms, Queries and Reports which in most cases the user will only need to use directly a small number of. To enhance the user experience and usage, we generally use switchboard menus (a collection of specially created forms) for the user to navigate around the Database.

As they will have the relevant tools available via these forms/buttons, the Ribbon, QAT and Navigation Pane are really redundant to them, and hiding them will tidy up the appearance of the database and also ensure no unexpected access features are selected.

Hiding the Ribbon

Using your Current Database options, you will generally set a Form to open when the Database is opened by the user. This Form we will create some code which will hide the Ribbon when the form is opened and again Show the ribbon when the Form is close.

Procedure: Hiding the Ribbon

1. Open within Design view the Form that is displayed when the Database is loaded.

2. Select the Design ribbon tab and click on Property Sheet to display.

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3. Within the Property Sheet window, select the Event tab and click the three dots button next to OnOpen event.

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4. Select the Code Builder option from the presented list and click OK.

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5. The Visual Basic Editor window will now display, ensure the following red text is entered as shown below.

DoCmd.ShowToolbar “Ribbon”, acToolbarNo

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6. Select the save button and close the Visual Basic Editor window.

Now you have the code set to hide the Ribbon while this specific form is opened, you will need to complete the next task to show the Ribbon again when the form is close.

Showing the Ribbon Again…

Once you have entered the code to hide the Ribbon, when you close your database the Ribbon will always be hidden. We resolve this problem by adding the code to the OnClose event of the Form to show the Ribbon again. .

Procedure: Showing the Ribbon

1. Open within Design view the Form that is displayed when the Database is loaded.

2. Select the Design ribbon tab and click on Property Sheet to display.

3. Within the Property Sheet window, select the Event tab and click the three dots button next to OnClose event.

4. Select the Code Builder option from the presented list and click OK.

4. The Visual Basic Editor window will now display, ensure the following red text is entered as shown below.

DoCmd.ShowToolbar “Ribbon”, acToolbarYes

5. Select the save button and close the Visual Basic Editor window.

Once the database is closed, each time it is opened the form will launch and the Ribbon will be hidden and then shown once the form is closed.

Hide the Navigation Pane

To ensure your general user audience cannot gain access to all of the database objects – only the ones you give them access to via a switchboard, hiding the Navigation Pane is the answer. This feature is set by database, even though you have hidden the Navigation Pane from one Database Application, it will re-appear for others.

Procedure: Hiding the Navigation Pane

1. Open the database you wish to hide the Navigation Pane for.

2. Select the File Backstage View button and click on Options.

3. Within the Options dialog box, select the Current Database section.

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4. Locate the Navigation section and de-select the Display Navigation Pane check box.

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5. Click OK to save the option change.

6. You will be prompted with the following dialog box, you must close the database down and re-open it for the change to take effect.

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7. To display the Navigation Pane in this Database again, repeat the above steps, selecting the Display Navigation Pane check box.

This article was written by Nick Williams. Nick is one of the Access course tutors at Acuity Training, a hands-on IT training company with offices in central London & Guildford UK.

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